Boats good, swimsuits bad

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Okay, so even if the weather permits it, we can’t be nude all the time.

Out at the boat ramp, for example, it is customary to wear swimsuits and/or T-shirts. There’s no practical reason to do so, it’s just what everyone expects, so we play along.

Once clear of the launch ramp, though, it’s perfectly OK to do the logical thing and just get rid of the swimwear. The Kingston area has many, many spots where you can drop anchor, strip off, and alternate between baking in the sun and cooling off in the lake for the better part of an afternoon.
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The debate over whether or not PFDs count as clothing is ongoing. They are, of course, required on this particular powerboat while we’re underway. Safety first!

Very few of the anchorages around here are busy enough for anyone to see whether you’re dressed or nude. In any case, our experience suggests that it’s highly unlikely that anyone will care. This is Canada, after all. We’re pretty easy-going.

Boating is perhaps one of the best ways to experience naturism. There’s virtually complete privacy out on the water, despite being completely out in the open. You have the sun, the breeze, the wonderful sounds of the water and the gentle rolling motion of the boat at anchor. Sail or power, it’s your choice – we’re into both, depending on wind, weather and which boats are available.

An awful lot of people have told me, over the years, that they like the idea of learning how to run a boat, of getting out there on the water, but they feel it’s just too expensive – fuel, repairs, insurance, marina fees, plus the boat itself. This need not be the case!

$1000 will get you a decent, used two- or three-person 14-foot sailboat. $2500 to $4000 scores you a perfectly serviceable 14-foot aluminum powerboat with a trailer and 10 to 20 hp engine, just the ticket for a small family or two couples to get to the best skinny-dipping spots. You won’t be taking it across Lake Ontario, but hundreds of inland lakes are now within your reach. The cost of ownership of such a boat? Less than $500 a year, if you learn how to do basic maintenance yourself. Share the boat among a few friends and it could very well amount to little more than pocket change.

If that’s still too steep, just pop over to Kingston’s Ahoy Rentals (or your local equivalent) and take your choice of canoes, kayaks or small sailboats out for a while, complete with a friendly instructor if you want one for your first trip. The Power & Sail Squadron will be happy to teach you the necessary safety and navigation knowledge over the winter.

Canadians are winterizing our small-craft fleets now, so there are some serious bargains to be had at the moment if you want to get out on the water next summer and can spare a bit of garage space in the meantime.

We’ll see you on the lakes just as soon as everything thaws out. And don’t forget to skip those swimsuits!

Posted by Matt of KFFBS

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